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How common is this?

re: How common is this?

Erin, I have been reading different places that it's getting harder and harder to find people for the skilled labor jobs and that people are rethinking the paths for education.

Welding jobs usually pay well. If he likes that kind of work he ought to be able to find jobs in that field.

re: How common is this?

There is a real need for skilled labor, and those jobs pay very well.


I person going to college for one thing and then getting a different job isn't a waste of money. It is not uncommon to not work in your major, but having a degree helped the person get the job in the first place.


re: How common is this?

What DD17 has learned so far in the past few months at Liberty is priceless. Speaking to her now, I feel an infectious intellectualism she never got at home. She is now evaluating world problems in a Biblical viewpoint. Her new friends are constantly texting Biblical verses to each other, and speaking freely about God and how He is intricately a part of all degrees. I am beyond thrilled for her.

Nonetheless, I know what Miss Mayberry is saying. The additional costs of education one doesn’t need can be detrimental. And, one has to figure in lost wages. Luckily for DD, she is starting college early and wasn’t ready for adulthood anyway. For her, even if she never uses her college knowledge for a career, she is developing her soul. But, I am confident she will figure it all out in the end. I am just going to work a few more shifts. Lol.

re: How common is this?

I think it depends on the person. Some will know by graduation exactly what they want to do. And if that involves getting a degree, then I think they should go for it.

But, if a student doesn't know for sure, or is a bit undecided, I feel it's best to hold off....spend time working, or do some mission work, or volunteer, or travel, or whatever until they learn more about what they want to do. There are so many jobs/careers that do not require a degree. It can be so difficult to know for sure at 18!

My dh knows quite a few people who are working in a job that is in no way related to their degree. I guess the best thing a student can do is really research and get lots of advice when thinking about college majors.

We can't always have control over how our interests will change as we mature into further adulthood, nor how the economy changes job opportunities. But just try to make the best decision we can.

We are friends with a hsing family that is pretty anti-college. But I think it just depends on what one wants to do. A student who really wants to be a nurse will obviously have to have a degree. But someone who is great working with their hands would be better off learning a trade or opening a business. I think that route is less risky!

re: How common is this?

So far we've done it both ways: Our oldest son graduated from high school and then worked full-time for 4 years before deciding to go to college. He's 22 and a freshman in college right now. Our middle son graduated from high school and then started college at the usual time. He's 19 and a sophomore. For each of them it was the right thing.

re: How common is this?

I think it depends on the child. I do believe college takes a special kind of kid, someone willing to sacrifice short term gain (in terms of money) for long term benefit. It also requires a strong work ethic, much self discipline, and a good moral compass to deal with all the liberalism that runs rampant in colleges and universities now. Finally, I think it’s important that a child have at least some idea of what he wants to do, even if he changes his mind several times after beginning the journey. I don’t think it’s a good idea to head to college just because, or without some direction of some kind. If a kid doesn’t exactly embody the above, perhaps he should wait a while, seek employment, or do something else worthwhile while he tries to determine where he wants to go in life.

Of course, if he does well in school, and if pretty certain he wants to do something that might require a degree, and is motivated, just doesn’t know for what, then perhaps entering college and taking some of the pre-req courses is a good idea to buy him some time. Those classes are never a waste because they are pretty much required for any degree, and when he does make up his mind, he’ll be that much closer to finishing. Sometimes it’s better not to interfere with the momentum, because if you do, it’s possible the child won’t want to restart school later.

Edited to fix typo

This post was edited on Nov 20, 2017 12:34 PM

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