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Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

Please give me your opinions and advice. My ds is in the 3rd grade.

re: Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

My ds is in 3rd as well, and we are using CTGE, although we did a trial run with RS English. We much prefer CTGE, although I think RS is very thorough.

R&S felt "harder" to us.
We did the lessons mostly orally with Rod and Staff (otherwise it would have been just too much), but ds is actually able to do the written work in CTGE. The workbook format is so much more user friendly for a reluctant writer IMHO(one page a day!). And retention is better for ds because he's the one writing it down.

R&S is teacher intensive. CTGE can be done relatively independantly. We are loving the "less handholding" route here.

Now when I say ds does it independantly, I don't mean I don't help. I HELP him, but the entire lesson doesn't require my undivided, uninterrupted attention for the lesson.

Hope this helps. I know both programs are thorough although not flashy, ;-) and have a similar scope.

re: Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

Yes, this definitely helps.

I didn't realize that CTGE was one one page a day. That's a plus!

re: Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

Of the two, I lean more toward CTGE. I prefer the wording and order or how they teach the concepts. I also like the worktext set-up a lot for our dc. It also just "feels" easier to me, especially in the upper levels. Another plus, from gr 4 up (I believe), they have 3 lessons/week w/ 2 practice sheets to use. This allows for a lot of flexibility to your weeks.

K

re: Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

I've only peeked at Climbing to Good English at a curriculum expo, so I don't have much to say about it. However, the workbook did not impress me, just at a glance. The font looks like an old typewriter. Now, I wouldn't hold that against it if I really wanted to use it for other reasons.

We use R&S, as HOD specifies it. We did all of R&S 2 and are in 3 now. We do most of it orally, so it goes fairly fast. We do diagramming on a lap-sized marker board. They have worksheets that are meant as a supplement but would do a good job at substituting for the oral work on busy days.

If they are equal in scope & sequence, perhaps budget would be a better guide.

re: Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

CTGE is consumable (but supercheap), R&S is nonconsumable.

We prefer CTGE, as it is a workbook, only a page a day (actually 3x a week unless you do the practice sheets too - which we do), and it very thorough. It teaches to the student, one chunk at a time, in a very plain and easily understandable manner. We found R&S to be super-wordy in its explanations and a lot of work - and not independent unless you really plan to have your children write it all out, which I can't do.

re: Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

It always surprises me when people say that R&S is "teacher-intensive."

Some years ago, the publisher.authors polled the Mennonite schools that used its textbooks. What they learned was that most of those schools were one-room, multigrade schools, where the teachers didn't have time to lecture and do projects and have discussions; mostly they had time to have the students correct seatwork/homework and make the next assignments.

So when they revised the existing series (English and math) and wrote the new ones (science and history) they made it a point to include all the instruction in the texts, so the students could read it and do the assignments.

I don't know what y'all do to make it teacher-intensive, or less independent. Maybe it's because you do so much orally? I figure if the children are not old enough to read and do the assignments, they don't need to know what's in there. :-)

The main difference between R&S and CTGE is that R&S is a textbook and CTGE is a workbook.

re: Climbing to Good English VS. R & S English

Yep, Ellie, I agree. My dd could actually read the whole lesson and do it all herself, only she wouldn't know if it was right except for me sitting there listening and looking at the answers, since we do it orally. Usually, I read it to her, but it is not necessary. Someone said it was wordy and teacher intensive, which blows my mind. It is actually wordy so the the teacher doesn't have to teach.

Teacher-intensive in my homeschool is something I have to put together from scratch and actually do the planning, not a book I open and read to my child. Well, that's my opinion.

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