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What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

I read the article from Teri Maxwell and I'm kind of confused. She mentioned Rod & Staff but no other specific Christian publisher. Neither are Christian publishers mentioned in her or her DH books (I have all of them...gosh).

Michelle30 briefly touched on it (in the original thread) but maybe I'm just slow.

What is the difference between what is traditional textbook and workbook? I thought CLP would be considered Traditional. I've only seen their 4th grade curriculum and thought it was very traditional. However, I have not seen higher or lower grades. So, it caught me off guard as to her suggestion that R & S readers and literature were the only publisher with traditional textbooks. I'm not necessarily questioning it, I just had never heard of the term "traditional Christian textbook". To me, everything is "workbook" because the books are all paperbacks instead of hardback like in the 70's & 80's...don't laugh at me... LOL. I think I sound crazy myself.

For me, I like CLP and Abeka because that is what I have seen thru CLP's 4th grade...that's all I know. Are these textbooks? I just recently saw sample pages of BJU Math on CBD...that looks good also.

Thanks
Tasha

re: What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

ABeka, BJUP, and Rod and Staff would be traditional Christian textbooks (yes, even though they use a few workbooks). In English, there are different books/workbooks for each "subsection" of English, i.e., grammar/composition, spelling, reading/literature, penmanship.

Alpha Omega, Christian Light, ACE, and Landmark, although Christian, are not traditional, as they use an all workbook format with several workbooks per subject per year. Usually all parts of English are included in a single series (ACE separates them out more).

HTH :-)

re: What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

Textbooks (per my thought)= any read to learn book for a subject. No matter if it's hardback or softcover.

Traditional textbook= read to learn using textbook.

Traditional Christian= from a Christian perspective.

Workbooks are wortexts. You can read from and write in the workbook. Sometimes there is teaching within the workbook itself and sometimes you have a text BOOk to read from and then a workbook to do practice problems in.


Traditional is not equal with older printings/books. It's equated with using textbooks and structured materials for learning. I think, anyway. Someone help me out here! :)
Michelle30

re: What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

Ok elliemaejune & michelle30, I think I've got it now. Those were good breakdowns.

Thanks so much.
Tasha

re: What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

I think what Terri is trying to say still supports the idea of using ACE, CLE, and Lifepac. What she's trying to say is, that the "uncreative" step-by-step approaches can still produce well-educated kids, who like to learn, without all the stress on mom.

For those who don't know Teri is a scheduling Guru. She wrote the book "Managers of their Homes" and her scheduling system is really intense, but when put into practice it works! So, the advice she's giving on textbooks sort of fits within her mentality. She really believes that an organized home honors the Lord and makes for a peaceful, happy home with more well disciplined kids. (don't we all!) So...it's not too surprising that she should favor a more no-nonsense approach to homeschooling.

I think she would say the same thing about CLE.

You said in your post, "CLP" though. Is CLP Christian Liberty Press? If so, then those would be traditional textbooks anyway.

re: What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

Hi Tasha,

Not that this has anything to do with your question, but on the MOTHboard at titus2.com Teri does mention that her family uses a lot of Abeka, along with R & S for reading. ; )

re: What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

Well, when I read the article, I took it to mean all Christian textbooks and worktexts. The difference is that in worktexts, you write in the book itself instead of on seperate paper.

If I recall, the mention of Rod and Staff in the article had to do with her opinion that they are one of they few publishers who are Christian, but don't include things that she deems inappropriate. This would be things like fairy tales or such.
It's been a while since I read the article, so I don't recall exactly.

HTH
Rita

re: What is considered Traditional, Christian Textbooks?

Thanks everyone for helping me understand the differences.

Tasha

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