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A secular curriculum like A Beka?

A secular curriculum like A Beka?

Hi there-
I'm considering homeschooling my kindergartner next year (for First Grade and maybe more), and have been talking with my friends that have done some homeschooling. I have looked through the A Beka books and really like the way they are laid out and their teaching supplementals and methods, but need something that isn't at all religious. I started to browse the review of curricula on this site, but was quickly overwhelmed by the number to go through! Does anyone have any suggestions? I have, of course, thought of removing the religious material from the A Beka books, but it's quite pervasive and seems silly to me to buy something and then remove a lot of it! Thanks for any advice.

re: A secular curriculum like A Beka?

You might like Calvert. It's laid out very well. It's calvertschool.org

HTH,
Melissa Little

re: A secular curriculum like A Beka?

repeat

This post was edited on Dec 07, 2008 10:56 PM

re: A secular curriculum like A Beka?

I was also thinking of Calvert.

re: A secular curriculum like A Beka?

Yep, Calvert or K12- K12 takes more time - is more involved. Calvert is less expensive and less involved, but not necessarily of any less caliber.

So I recommend Calvert, too. We used them and had a very good experience. They are a good company with excellent materials.

re: A secular curriculum like A Beka?

I don't personally recommend K-12 because K-12 is basically is "public school at home".... government funded and government endorsed. I know some use and enjoy K-12, and I'm sure it's a better alternative than sending them *out* to public school, but I wouldn't do it. There are too many other good options available.

re: A secular curriculum like A Beka?

As was stated above...CAVERT, CALVERT, CALVERT. I love, for ds, the school at home approach. I narrowed our choices down to Seton (Catholic), Abeka or Calvert. All are rock solid. we are Catholic, so Seton 'won' for us.

Had I wanted a secular version of it, hands down I would have chosen calvert.
http://www.calvertschool.org/home-school

HTH==
Anne

re: A secular curriculum like A Beka?

kayrenee
K12 is not ONLY a government program. Yes many states use K12 as their curriculum for cyber schooling/virtual schooling, but K12 can be used as a independent user, paid for by yourself, just like any other homeschooling curriculum. That is how I did it last year for 4th grade, and for the past three years for History only.
K12 is a very strong program, that both public school "cyber schoolers" and independent Home-schools can benefit from.

Their elementary history program was co-written by Susan Wise Bauer, also the author of Story of the World. You can't get any more homeschool-oriented than that. As a matter of fact, after using Story of the World Book 1 for a year and then going to K12, many of the stories were the same. My son, per the K12 lesson instructions, creates a page for his "lapbook" after each lesson, either a paragraph or picture. Now they don't call it a Lapbook at K12, but a History binder, but nonetheless, that is exactly what it is, a lapbook. You can't get any more classical homeschooling than that.

I can't compare K12 to Abeka, as we have never used it, but I can compare K12 with Calvert, as we used both. I was highly dissappointed in Calvert. Their science (at least for 1st grade when we used it) was simply a hardcover McGraw-Hill science book, straight from a public-school publisher. The assignment was to read the page and discuss. Not very "sciencey". They don't even begin to touch History at that level, except for a few short stories. I believe the Calvert theory is to wait until closer to 3rd grade for History, if I remember right. Their language arts program was decent, but I am pretty sure it would not be up to Abeka, which I have heard is just a very strong program.

Calvert also had alot of nonsense, these short stories and poems, that were just like "What's the point?"....my son would look at like me and I was just couldnt' disagree with his thoughts.

I almost think that someone who is looking for a Abeka similiar program needs to start looking at individual components, from different publishers, and get the right program for each subject, instead of a "boxed whole" program.
hth
K

12

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