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re: 17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post

17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post

I was curious about the different state requirements regarding math requirements, so I googled it. This is very interesting to me. I found that there are 17 states that do NOT require Algebra OR Geometry. According to https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.centerforpubliceducation.org/Main-Menu/Policies/Understanding-the-Common-Core/Out-of-Sync-Many-Common-Core-states-have-yet-to-define-a-Common-Core-worthy-diploma/Detail-on-mathematics-graduation-requirements-from-public-high-schools-by-state.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwjF67Ws0YnVAhUJ3YMKHe0TDokQFggpMAU&usg=AFQjCNGdtxKiDlHYJ6cQv7RXJDmmc0HnOA

I hope I pasted that right..that is an awfully long link. Anyway here they are:

Alaska
Colorado
Iowa
Maine
Massachusetts
Missouri
Nevada
New York
North Dakota
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Vermont
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

And Kansas and Nebraska both state that students must have 3 math credits that include algebraic and geometric concepts, but they don't specifically state they must take Algebra 1 or Geometry

Midwestmomof2 (hope I got your name right), Indiana says to graduate a student in Indiana must complete Algebra 1 AND 2 and Geometry. Just thought I would mention that since you are on the fence about it with your daughter.

This post was edited on Jul 14, 2017 04:01 PM

re: 17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post

I think it's a good reminder to add that very few states tell homeschoolers what they have to do in order to graduate a student.

You can do or not do whatever you want. I'm in a state where I get to decide on this stuff. Even with my cover school, they only make recommendations based on GOALS you have.

I do know that some people look to what public schools are requiring so that they are offering similar stuff.

I know others who look at what colleges want for admissions.

There are no states that I know of that require students to read the Bible. Yet, I still have my kids do that.

Enjoy the variety. :)

re: 17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post

Bec

This may sound too personal on my side. But I left some links for you in the other thread that I honestly hoped could be helpful to your creative loving daughter to have some fun with algebra (if you decide to continue teaching the course that is).

There were a few project ideas from classroom teachers who like to find ways to use art projects with things like slope intercept. I'm thinking those practical helps and applications got lost in the philosophical discussion. I would have said something on that thread, but as you pointed out, it was long already.

I hope the art plans might bring some fun to your dd's school semester if you decide that they fit your needs. :)

re: 17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post

Cbollin, yes, I saw those links last night, but it was late, and by the time I got back on here just now the other post was 2 or 3 pages longer, and I forgot all about them. They sound really interesting, and I am going to take a look at them! I'm going to start calling you the link queen. Lol! You always do so much research to find helpful links for all of us. :)

I don't know how other states work, but here in Illinois we homeschoolers do not have complete freedom to not follow the state guidelines on graduation. This is a pretty good state to homeschool in,but for high school we still have to have our dc meet the minimum requirements. I was shocked that so many states don't have to do any algebra or Geometry!

re: 17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post

oh ok. I just wanted to make sure you knew they were there if you wanted them. I do "over link" don't I? (cheesy grin)

Interesting on that about Illinois. I'm finding info that says homeschoolers are considered private schools. and that private schools " Each Illinois private school develops their own and gives their own graduation diploma.

Are you saying that not really the case that private schools can't develop their own diploma (which doesn't mean piece of paper in this context but course of study to graduate) ? I see that homeschoolers have to teach the "branches" of education. and Math is one of those.

I know colleges will want certain stuff. But that's whole other discussion about reference points for graduation requirements.

But I'm curious on that side topic that in Illinois you don't have the freedom of other private schools. I know. It's already going to be another long thread. sorry

ps: edit. I see the part in Illinois with branches of
education taught to children of corresponding age and grade in the public schools,
however, in public schools, not all children take the same Math branch the same time in high school. And there are variations of alg 1A, and Geo 1A. So you may have more freedom on this than it may seem????? (I'm not a lawyer)

This post was edited on Jul 14, 2017 04:53 PM

re: 17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post


that is an awfully long link
--------

You can say that again! I've never seen one that long before. <chuckle>

That many states is shocking to me. I'm wondering about a couple of things:

1) "algebraic and geometric concepts" were mentioned, which sounds suspiciously like algebra and geometry classes, or maybe differently-named classes but teaching those same things, and

2) If Common Core is changing things around? But I thought that was supposed to make things more rigorous, not less? IIRC, some states which have adopted CC are now teaching Algebra I in 8th grade.

Seems to me that the main thing for college-bound students is, what do colleges require?

But honestly, I cannot believe that all those states do not require Algebra and Geometry (or at least one of the two). Some of those states have very high academic reputations. JMHO

re: 17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post

But honestly, I cannot believe that all those states do not require Algebra and Geometry (or at least one of the two
***

Agreeing with you gr8. I think the document Bec found is not current or something.

I just randomly picked a state on the list (New York) and then found New York City's high school requirements. They seem to have Regents requirements (state stuff) that indicate some "advanced" math which is geometry or alg 2. And that's for the "regular" vs "advanced diploma"

now I picked West Virginia from that list that Bec found (she didn't make the list), and it's clear WV requires algebra in spite of the wording on the chart Bec linked. There's various "pathway sequences" for various levels of diplomas. The skilled diploma does have a variance in there for Math 1, but those are not the typical learners. The recommended course sequence in the skilled pathway is Algebra I or Math I, Geometry, Conceptual Mathematics, and Transition Mathematics for Seniors or Algebra II. (and yes, they need 4 credits)

I see some other states that it's a matter of semantics. Alg and Geo are needed, but can be other course names, or can test out (like getting a 19 on math ACT).
I know Bec linked in good faith. But some of the chart has information that is outdated, or not being expressed in the best manner if the take away is that alg or geometry is not required.

And just to be clear: The 1 or 2 that I listed are not the only ones on the chart with misleading info, or outdated, or just being spun the way the OP wants.

it's going to be another long thread, isn't it? topics to include: comparison of state requirements, contrast within the same state on various diploma paths, do homeschoolers have to follow those? what happens if they don't. what about SPED students?




(and this may be obvious, but edit to add: The list is talking about what states tell public schools to do. not what homeschools do by law. two different topics :)

This post was edited on Jul 16, 2017 11:21 AM

re: 17states do NOT require Algebra or Geometry s/o of my Algebra post

We ARE considered a private school, including having to have a name for our "school". However, we do still have to meet the state's minimum requirements.

"Home-schooling in Illinois is considered to be a form of private education. Parents who choose to educate their children at home are under a legal obligation to meet the minimum requirements stated in Illinois’ Compulsory Attendance Law (Section 26-1 of the Illinois School Code). Parents who choose to educate their children at home are obligated to teach their children “…the branches of education taught to children of corresponding age and grade in the public schools” and they are further obligated to offer instruction in these core courses in the English language. The “branches of education” include language arts; mathematics; biological and physical sciences; social sciences; fine arts; and physical development and health.

In a 1950 decision of the Illinois Supreme Court, People v. Levisen, the Court held that home-schooling could be considered private schooling if the teacher were competent, the required subjects were taught, and the student received an education at least equivalent to public schooling.

Parents who permit a child to attend a home school that is up to the standard of Section 26-1, as interpreted by Levisen, are free to decide the manner, time and materials which best suit the learning needs of their children. Parents may determine what type of home-schooling curriculum is best for their students, what materials to use, how much homework to assign, how homework is to be assessed, and what records of the student’s accomplishments should be kept. "

So, while we may choose which curriculum, or how to teach a certain subject, we must adhere to the guidelines all high school students in the state follow. However, we are required to teach Algebra 1, and a math that "contains geometry". That technically, doesn't mean it has to BE Geometry. Saxon Pre Algebra CONTAINS Geometry. I plan to have my dd take Geometry, but I know of other homeschoolers who have not due to the wording. Several of the state I listed above contain similar wording.

I didn't pay attention to how current the article I posted was...I'll go check. It was a download PDF, so I can't do it from this post without losing this post. However, it was word for word correct for Illinois.

This post was edited on Jul 14, 2017 05:28 PM

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