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re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

CLE Language Arts and TESOL

I have been considering Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages next year (I already got some practice last year, and am trying to decide now, if I'll continue).'

One dad has asked me to teach him and his children (possibly 7-8 students). He would like me to use CLE Language Arts paces, beginning from Grade 1 and working up! Also, they live 8 hours away, so we'd have to do intensive language lessons via Skype (probably twice a week). This is all The Lord Willing. A BIG challenge, I know!

Soooooooo, I have 2 questions:

1. Do any of you have lightly used or almost new CLE LA paces that you don't need any more? We have used and re-used paces for grades 2-8. I can use these myself (for my side of the Skype "classroom"), but I would still need 2 sets of 1st grade paces, and 1 set of 2nd and onward.
So, more simply, does anyone have 1st and/or 2nd grade CLE Language Arts paces that are lightly used or nearly new and which they won't need any more?

2. Does anyone have any suggestions, as to HOW this could work? I have already decided I should probably do two study groups, a higher level and a lower level, but still... How?

re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

bump :)

re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

My husband and I are current (my husband) and former (myself) ESL teachers.

I wouldn't say CLE would be my first choice, though a good teacher can make anything work. :o)

Are you a native English speaker? Or do you speak it proficiently at this point in time? Do you have any teaching experience, either English or in any other subject? Do your potential students speak any English at all, and do you know their level? Can you administer a test to determine it, if not known? Do you know what their expectations are, i.e. what level of English proficiency they hope/expect to attain, and in what time frame?

All these things would help you as you plan how to best teach this group.

re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Are you a native English speaker? Or do you speak it proficiently at this point in time? Do you have any teaching experience, either English or in any other subject? Do your potential students speak any English at all, and do you know their level? Can you administer a test to determine it, if not known? Do you know what their expectations are, i.e. what level of English proficiency they hope/expect to attain, and in what time frame?

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Thanks for the reply and the questions! :)

Yes, I'm a native English speaker. We speak English at home. I've had a little teaching experience. A few years ago I taught piano to about 6 or 7 students, and of course, I've helped my siblings in their studies when possible. I had 5 or 6 language students last year. I gave private lessons. It was a good experience for me.
I've wanted to be a teacher for years! :)

Each student's English level is different. Every single one's. But the family in question - the dad and the oldest four do speak and read English some. They understand quite a bit. The younger ones don't understand a whole lot when you talk to them.
Yes, I can administer a test. I thought I'd have the dad and oldest ones do CLE's 1st grade level diagnostic test, and see how they do on that. Personally, I would prefer using something else, but using CLE was the dad's request.

They basically want to devote much of the next school year (they homeschool) to language learning, both English and a local language (they moved, so they're learning the local language where they live now). I think what the dad is thinking is that since this is real curriculum that native English speaking children use, and we would be starting with 1st grade, then they would be getting an English education equivalent to native speakers. Am I making sense? Do you think it will work?

re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

I think what the dad is thinking is that since this is real curriculum that native English speaking children use, and we would be starting with 1st grade, then they would be getting an English education equivalent to native speakers. Am I making sense? Do you think it will work?



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I see! And I think he has a valid point. One thing to consider, though, especially for some of those younger ones who don't speak much English at all, is that their English proficiency may take a bit longer to be achieved than a native speaker's, considering that 1) they'll likely be speaking their own native tongue to one another throughout the day, whereas ESL students in English-speaking countries are forced, via immersion, to hear and speak English much of the day; and 2) they will ALSO be trying to learn the other language of the country to which they've moved.

There's nothing wrong with either of those factors, :) but is he aware of them? -- of their significance, that is to say?

Social media, such as FB, and English-speaking movies and sitcoms, etc. will help them understand idiomatic English as well as correct pronunciation. A rigid, textbook understanding of a language versus a fluid, idiomatic understanding of it is one of the things that often separates those who feel they've really mastered a language versus those who don't, (and consequently, often keep interpreting the target language through their native tongue first, in their mind).

As for whether it **can** work -- I absolutely think it potentially can! You sound like me, someone who has wanted to teach since childhood, yes? :) That being the case, you're probably a natural teacher and will have the vivacity and creativity to adapt and flex to fit their learning needs. :) It sounds very exciting, I think. :)

re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

I totally understand what you mean about the younger ones. I think the dad is aware of these factors, too.
I think that I should make two study groups, 1) the dad and the oldest four who know more English, and 2) the younger children.
I think I could teach the 1st group using the CLE paces, but I don't know about the younger ones even having enough English ability to understand the directions in the book or even my directions, especially at first. So I think I should probably do something simpler with them first, until they get up to the CLE grade 1 level. Do you think this approach would work? What could I use for the younger ones?


"As for whether it **can** work -- I absolutely think it potentially can! You sound like me, someone who has wanted to teach since childhood, yes? :) That being the case, you're probably a natural teacher and will have the vivacity and creativity to adapt and flex to fit their learning needs. :) It sounds very exciting, I think. :)"

Thanks for the encouragement! Yes, I have wanted to teach since childhood. For years I dreamed of being a 1st through 4th grade teacher. A couple years ago though, I realized that I do not want to be a teacher in the public school system. I don't want to help this awful system prosper.
I would like to be a teacher, like you said, that has the vivacity and creativity to adapt and flex to fit each student's individual learning needs.

I just watched this a few days ago. Wow!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCFg9bcW7Bk

This post was edited on Jul 18, 2017 04:03 PM

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Hi! Update: I had the three oldest girls of that family (who are visiting us right now) take the CLE Diagnostic test for level 100 (level 1).
This is what the CLE diagnostic book says:
"For Level 100. If the student has 66 or more correct
answers, he is prepared for Level 200. If fewer than 66
are correct, the student is not prepared for Level 200,
and should do all or most of Language Arts 100 before
entering Level 200. If the number correct is 55 or
more, check the test for an unusual weakness in one or
more concepts. If most errors were made in one or two
groups, perhaps some remedial work could adequately
prepare the child for the next level. However, exercise caution. It is better to build confidence in the child by letting him move quickly through material at an easier level than to frustrate him with a higher level than he can efficiently manage."

The three girls got 66, 64, and 62 correct answers. So should I just review the areas that they are a little weak in, and start them in 2nd grade? I thought of having them take the Level 200 diagnostic test as well. Do you think that's the way to go?

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

That sounds like a great idea -- having them take the level 200 test.

I'd also see what specific concepts were covered by the questions they got wrong. It may just be areas you can review with more emphasis and time, allowing them to all still start at the level 200.

By the way, are you familiar with ABeka's Handbook for Reading? This is just a slim volume, but this one book could help you teach someone to read, as well. (It would need to be supplemented with work you'd assign, but -- to me -- it's nothing short of phenomenal how it approaches teaching reading.) Jossey-Bass publisher's Phonics Pathways by Dolores Hiskes is a black and white version that does the same. As you're interested in teaching English, either or both of these volumes might be something you'd be very interested in owning, for your own teaching use and reference. :)

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