Homeschooling Discussions


Reply to topic

Search

re: Sonlight *sigh*

re: Sonlight *sigh*

morningsong, thank you for sharing that info!

and lovemychildren..wow, that's so sad to me. I understand, thanks for helping me to see that perspective. I live in rural AL and would not have thought about it like that for others. Although I will sadly say that more and more is creeping into our rural parts as well. I'd like to ask..what do you use?

re: Sonlight *sigh*

<<and lovemychildren..wow, that's so sad to me. I understand, thanks for helping me to see that perspective. I live in rural AL and would not have thought about it like that for others. Although I will sadly say that more and more is creeping into our rural parts as well. I'd like to ask..what do you use?>>

You know, in some ways it certainly is sad. But, to flip the coin, it sure makes for a beautiful mission field! My children know all about the ways of the world, and not from the news or a book, but from real life. From what I can tell, they get what can happen in a fallen world. To illustrate, our next door neighbor is dying - Hospice is now there, of A I D S (which he contracted from his mom at birth). He is 26. His son is 6. My children understand his and his son's need of the Gospel, and they also see what the devastating effects of sin can be. Firsthand. Real life, involving people they know about and care about. My neighbor on the other side is raising their ggd, bc their daughter is too busy for her gd, and the child's mom, my neighbor's gd, is in jail. She is here all.the.time. which helps us to be able to teach her about the Lord, which is truly a blessing for us.

So, yes, it is sad, but it also enables us to do something we could never do if we lived on a ranch in the middle of nowhere. We can truly share the God's Word all.the.time. With people who urgently need it, and honestly, with many who have never even heard it. I actually posted about this over a year ago, that our 8 yo neighbor down the street, when asked what she knew about Jesus, actually asked us what channel He came on. This same child has since told us that she doesn't go to church because her parents told her it costs too much money. Oh, I had a field day with that one. We are still teaching her about Christianity, and she keeps coming back, so I am optimistic that perhaps there is one more heart turning toward Him.

My life centers around sharing the gospel, and as much I envision how lovely the country is, the simple truth is that I really don't think I could live very long in a place where such opportunity wasn't in my face all the time. I guess we're all wired differently, and that's great, because we're all needed to fill different but equally important roles in this temporary home. My mission field is here, and I have long accepted that. The Lord made it very clear to us many moons ago that we are to stay and do His work here, so that what we do. :)

Now, as far as what curriculum we use, next year we are using all R&S. In the past I have used, and love different Anabaptist materials, such as CTGE and Strayer-Upton's Practical Arithmetic, and Pathway Readers, but I wanted everything laid out for me, no planning or organizing, and open and go. School is such a small part of what we do each day, and it needs to take no more time that absolutely necessary to complete. Also, I went for the all in one bc it makes it easier on me to enforce the completion of it if it is all from one publisher, as in "See, this is what is expected of you for grade X from R&S" as opposed to "Here's a list of subjects that I would like to cover" (MM turned me on to this way of thinking, and I think it's brilliant bc my dc have totally bought into it - I've gotten the "OK, we see what is required for grade X because R&S makes this and that")

re: Sonlight *sigh*

Truthwalker, your thoughts about Sonlight echo mine. My oldest son still wishes we could have kept using it, but he understands why we couldn't. I am very happy with the HOD we are using, and I am glad there are some projects and writing assignments as well as great reading. One of the best benefits has been transitioning the students toward independence as well.

re: Sonlight *sigh*

How do you use HOD independently? Do you let them use the book as a guide or do you make them a checklist to go by yourself?
I've ordered a MFW catalog and I'm going to take a good look at it. I could combine my youngest three students in it pretty easy.(10, 8, and 6)
I'm still looking into Diana Waring also.

Thanks for all the great advice and comments. You've all been a big help!

re: Sonlight *sigh*

Truthwalker wrote:
I do realize that, with a lit program, not all books can be Christian, but I think they CAN all be wholesome. I'm just not going to use a book that teaches evolution and then try to tell my child that it's wrong and then expect them to trust the rest of the book. There are alot of wholesome books out there and a lot of good biblically accurate books to choose from.
-----------
I totally get this and agree with you. I have one child who's particularly sensitive to this, actually, and questions for herself why we sometimes happen to have books that teach evolution as truth sitting on our personal bookshelves for the purpose of education. She has developed the mindset (of her own choosing), that if a book begins with that premise, then why bother looking to it for further knowledge acquisition when we can look in resources that begin with truth. (That is, unless you are trying to search out the fallacies of evolution).

This is why I could not use HOD's Preparing with her this last year, as it was available to me for free, offered by a friend. As much as I respect how Carrie has chosen to use the actual materials in a God-centered way, which she does, I couldn't get past the strong evolutionary content in CHOW, a main resource for that year. It's a charming book, and I can see why she has chosen to use parts of it, but I know my dd would be disturbed by it should she stumble across the evolutionary content, knowing it's one of her foundational school books. I also don't like how HOD has included one of the SOTW books in the most recent year, knowing that its publisher is a strong supporter of old-earth creationism (Peacehill Press). (MFW uses SOTW too, but they did so before knowing the controversies at hand, and I appreciate the measures they've taken to get the evolution out of that WH encyclopedia). Again, I can understand the draw with its charming story-telling format, but with it being a matter of principle, I just can't willingly give my money to support Peacehill Press when I have other options. I'm sure many would disagree with me on that, which is fine. That's just where I stand.

...Which is why I also agree with your observations about SL as well. ...Which is why I've learned to just piece together my own thing for history/SS that suits my family best, using both trusted Christian publishers and living books that I feel comfortable with, especially with my younger children who are still developing a sense of discernment and wisdom.

Nancy

re: Sonlight *sigh*

I think for many of us SL has always been a bit of a frustration. It is so close in so many ways. And yet, so far in others.

I have used SL for several years of our hsing. In fact, one of my **favorite** years of hsing was SL5. (Who knows what it is called now.) It was basically a focus on the 10/40 Window and used a book called, "Remembering God's Awesome Acts" which was OUTSTANDING!

I haven't looked at it recently but back in the day the lower levels relied heavily on Osbourne Books and the high school levels had MANY "dark" or negative literature choices. There are a few years in the middle that could be used quite well without a huge amount of tweaking.

That said, I only used the LA program one year and I never ever used the science.

If you really like MOST of the package and you can't find anything similar you like I would recommend buying JUST the IG (instead of a package) and any books you KNOW you'll want. Skip the books that you find offensive. There is always PLENTY of reading material there. You can skip some books and still have a GREAT program.

If you only like SOME of a package, just order the books and add it to something you are already doing.

Personally I think it is really hard to buy a complete program from any one publisher.

You mentioned DW and I would encourage you that her program is really very good. There are a lot of CHOICES, which allows you to select what would sit well in your heart. You might want to consider buying the DW guides and cds and then selecting some of the SL choices that attract you to the SL program.

The mapwork in DW is better (in my opinion) than that is SL. I guess I say "better" when what I mean is "more detailed." You aren't just marking places, you are looking at how the rise and fall of powers looked on the world map. You don't just know where France is, you know who was in power of France throughout history.

If you like to do history chronologically, DW is very much a chronological program. Of course, you can jump in wheverever you want to.

The guide book isn't a "daily lesson" plan (or didn't use to be) BUT she asks great questions and that offers a lot of conversation. (SL is good in that it gives you the answers, or used to, if you weren't always wherever your kids were w/the reading.)

DW can be used along side of your children or older children can do it independently.

DW is definitely more flexible. :)

re: Sonlight *sigh*

ilovemychildren,

We've got the same scenarios over here too. I had to laugh at the speedo visual you gave us, b/c we used to have neighbors with a swimming pool right behind us, and they LIVED in that pool all summer...bikini's and speedos and all. Oh how I wished that privacy fences were allowed in our sub. It's a battle with the world everytime we walk out the door.

Just wanted to say that your stories are interesting, and I love how you are embracing the mission field over there. :)

Nancy

re: Sonlight *sigh*

Truthwalker, I combine my middle three--9th, 5th, and 6th. The 9th grader does the extensions and some of the high school stuff I have here from her older brother. The boxes are labeled I (independent), S (semi-independent, which has meant independent at our house), and T (Teacher-led). As you go up in the guide there are less and less T boxes. I leave the teacher's guide out open on the table if they need additional information, and I do make them a short check-list that they just check off as they go every day. I have a time each day that I check their work and ask them questions about what they have read and written for the day. The two page notebook layout makes it easy to see at the end of the week if anyone "skipped" an assignment. The independence factor is one of the reasons we switched from MFW. I like MFW, but I like the independence factor, the grammar and writing, the notebooking pages and the science better with HOD. There is also less repetition of information between sources. Although many seem to think that it is harder to combine with HOD, I have not found it to be. I can't combine my K and 2nd grader with the above group, but I couldn't do that when we were using MFW either. The little ones just got lost in the dust. That is how we got started with HOD. I was using MFW with the olders, the littles were lost, and I got Beyond for the 1st and 2nd grader at that time.
Don't get me wrong, I do like MFW, and after HOD and MOH, MFW would be my next pick. Good luck deciding, and I hope BJU is perfect for this season, this year of schooling for you. I do think you may have a good idea with leaving the two oldest in BJU and combining the youngers. I think I would at least have done a couple of BJU onlines with my olders if I had it to do over again while still having so many little ones, but we still did well without them, so...

123456

Reply to topic

Search


Return to Homeschooling Discussions